Solarization

I decided to attempt solarization after looking at Man Rays "solarized nudes". The way that the image almost becomes a negative again is really interesting to me so I wanted to try and achieve almost the same affect as Ray achieved. The photos that I have solarized are all long exposures from my first long exposure attempt (previous post).



6 Seconds

2.5 Contrast

5.6 Aperture












Solarization Attempt 1

After the initial exposure to the image I then put the exposed paper into the developer for round about 10 seconds until the image just started to show. Then I placed the image into a tray filled with water (to slow down the developing process), then re exposed the image to light for 2 seconds and finally back into the developer for the remainder of the time (50 seconds).


I did not leave the image in the developer (after exposure to light) for long enough and therefore the effects are not as strong as noticeable as they could be.




Solarization Attempt 2


I repeated exactly what I had done the first time around but instead of leaving the image in the developer for the existing amount of time, I kept a close eye on the image itself to see how effective the results would be.


I left it in the developer for 1 minute 20 and I am very happy with the results.







Original

6 Seconds

2.5 Contrast

5.6 Aperture


I decided to solarize another image just to make sure that I really understood the process and make sure that the first attempt wasn't a fluke.







Solarization






This image was in the developer for 1 minute 20 seconds, the same amount of time the other image was in the developer. I chose this time as the exposure conditions were exactly the same and I am very happy with the results.











Now that I have been able to solarize 2 images successfully, I am confident that I would be able to go back to this process in the future. I thought that maybe I might be able to use this process in my own work but it all depends on weather it suits what I am able to portray.


5 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

David Royston Bailey, born January 2nd, 1938 in London, to Herbert Bailey (father) and Sharon Bailey (mother). Throughout his school years, Bailey struggled as he suffers with dyslexia and dyspraxia a